How does it differ from NAFTA? And how does this affect your FedEx emissions? Find answers to these and other questions, and find out what you need to do to prepare programs under the new agreement. To be able to navigate after the new agreement comes into effect on July 1, 2020, refer to the information provided by your automation platform below. You can easily prepare original labels and certificates and ensure that your shipments benefit from the USMCA/T-MEC/CUSMA. This section is updated regularly, so check often. For the first time in a U.S. trade agreement, the agreement prohibits local data storage requirements in circumstances where a financial supervisory authority has access to the data it needs to fulfill its regulatory and supervisory mandate. The renegotiated agreement contains a chapter on macroeconomic policies and exchange rate issues, with new political and transparent monetary commitments. The chapter will address unfair monetary practices by requiring high-level commitments to avoid any devaluation of competition and to target exchange rates, while significantly increasing transparency and providing accountability mechanisms. This approach is unprecedented in the framework of a trade agreement and will contribute to strengthening macroeconomic stability and exchange rates. For the first time, a trade agreement requires the United States to reach an agreement with Mexico and Canada to increase the de minimis value of delivery to facilitate the strengthening of cross-border trade. For the first time in decades, Canada will increase its de minimis level from $20 to $40 for taxes. Canada will also offer duty-free shipments of up to 150 $US. Mexico will continue to provide $50 of tax-exempt de minimis and will also provide duty-free shipments up to the equivalent of $117.

Shipping rates to this level would be achieved with minimum formal entry procedures, which would allow more businesses, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises, to be part of cross-border trade. On July 1, 2020, a new trade agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada will replace the 25-year-old North American Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Each participating country has its own name for this. The United States, Mexico and Canada have reached agreement on a modernized, quality chapter of intellectual property (IP) that provides effective protection and protection and intellectual property rights essential to promoting innovation, economic growth and supporting American jobs. There is currently no formal certification of the original USMCA, issued by the government or approved by the state. In accordance with the text of the agreement, all certifications must include a series of “minimum data elements.” The agreement stipulates that the value of the import does not exceed USD 1,000 or the corresponding amount in the currency of the importing party or a higher amount, as the importer can see. The terms of the USMCA remain in effect for a period of 16 years during which the parties may decide to review and/or renegotiate the terms or withdraw from the agreement. However, after six years, the duration of the sinking of the USMCA (16 years) may be revised and possibly extended if the parties believe that this would be beneficial. Although no certificate of origin is required for the above product categories for the right to the USMCA/T-MEC/CUSMA, it is still the importer`s responsibility to maintain all valid evidence of origin in the use of free trade agreements. They must ensure that all products receiving preferential tariff treatment are effectively authorised – the applicability of origin can be requested/demanded by the relevant customs authorities during an inspection.

Notification of preferential rates without valid proof of origin on the date of importation may suspend your company from significant retroactive customs duties, interest and penalties.